Protecting Children and Their Mothers From Abortionists

I’ve mentioned before that I love the movie “It’s A Wonderful Life.” As you read the following, ask yourself how this might have turned out had any of the players not been on the scene. And how many children die, as did George’s brother or the men on that military transport in the movie, because those who should have been there for them were themselves killed- or for that matter survived the abortion holocaust but did nothing for those who remain at risk.

Today at Planned Barrenhood in St. Louis, the Holy Spirit was  nothing if not persistent:

didn’t let the weather dictate the fate of Andrea’s child;
prodded Coalition to be on the front lines;
pushed my car up our steep ice covered street on the third attempt to allow me to even be  there;
guided my collaboration with the Coalition team which led me to hop in my car so
long after Andrea left the mill in the hopes that I might be able to find her;
and nudged Andrea to accept our offer of help.

To back up a bit. St. Louis woke up this morning to the remnants of an ice storm. As a result many who normally would be at the mill were not. So I soloed, jogging between the entrance and “working the fence” as parents arrived to do the unthinkable. Most waved me off, a couple using only one finger. Several took the information I offered: on their child, what an abortionist does to a human being and help that’s available. Information they would not receive inside the mill, as an informed mother is a threat to an abortionist’s bottom line.

As the morning wore on a couple of Coalition for Life activists arrived and took over at the entrance. I continued to work the fence- reminding parents it was not too late, cautioning them that abortionists only offer them a problem they don’t already have (the unthinkable), and confirming the help that we offer. As those who have done this work know, it is physically, psychologically and spiritually exhausting.

Later, as one of the youths from the weekly Generation Life Rosary group left for the day, he made mention that a mom was turned away at the gate by the Coalition team. Great news! I went back to work. Several minutes later it dawned on me that Coalition might not have know that (because of the weather)  Thrive was not open. I hurried over to the entrance and confirmed they had unwittingly sent the mom to the closed center.  I decided I would drive over to Thrive and see if I could find the mom. It was a long-shot. To say the least. For by then quite a bit of time had elapsed. But something told me to go. So off I went.

I was told it was a black car and that the mother said she “wasn’t from around here.” Not much to go on. Thrive is only three blocks away but I knew I was racing against time. When I got there I noticed several cars parked at the curb. One of the black cars caught my attention. It had a single occupant as well as Illinois plates.

The Holy Spirit prodded me to approach. I caught the attention of the woman inside the car. I leaned down on the passenger’s side. As she opened the window I knelt alongside the car. I  spotted a Thrive card lying in her lap. A quick prayer. She confirmed she was Andrea.  I apologized that we sent her to a closed center, noting that the weather had wreaked havoc on our support system. I told her that Mary, who has been doing sidewalk counseling for decades, was also trapped by the weather but was working from home. I gave her Mary’s card. Andrea was reluctant to call.  I assured her that Mary was there for her. It didn’t take much prodding and she agreed to call. It was actually at that point that I first learned her name and assured Andrea that we would be praying for her by name (so please do!).
On my way home I got a call from Mary who said Andrea had called. Mary was upbeat. She confirmed Andrea was abortion minded so Mary had much work to do on the call. Mary was compassionate enough to tell Andrea the truth. And to offer to help her in any way she could. Not the false “compassion” of those who would claim the same for mom but ignore the fate of her child.
Mary noted there was some back and forth between her and Andrea. Unless you’ve been in such a conversation, you can’t imagine the strain, aware with every word you speak that a child’s life hangs in the balance. Andrea told Mary she had done research on line and was uneasy about her own safety at the hands of an abortionist. Mary validated those concerns and steadily guided Andrea to the point that she accepted an appointment on Monday with one of our doctors.

Mary could do that on the spot because our doctors get it.
You see Dr. Dixon works with us on the front lines and understands that situations such as this need to be triaged to the front of the line. A human being is in imminent danger. No time to be on the list that is his packed clinic schedule. It is not hyperbole to say these doctors are the MASH Unit of the abortion holocaust. They hover close to the front lines and are always available to provide the medical care such mothers and their children need when we are able to “evacuate” them from the middle of the battle.

So a day that started with an ice storm that shut down the two St. Louis area alternative pregnancy centers, crippled our Thrive van, cancelled the Archdiocese’s monthly Intercessors of the Lamb witness at the mill, stranded Mary seemingly in a place where she would be unable to make a difference, and very nearly left me stranded 30 miles from the front; ended up with the Holy Spirit taking charge (as usual) such that a rag tag team of broken vessels were each exactly where we needed to be at just the right time.

It is indeed A Wonderful Life.

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